tierracita:

Dear community of friends, family, and supporters.

We are three queer fatties of color and this will be our first time attending the Allied Media Conference. We really need your support getting there! 

The Allied Media Conference is in Detroit, Michigan June 19th-22nd. Our workshop was accepted and we are excited to present as part of theAbundant Bodies track! We have not been in any way able to afford this conference in the past and it’s prevented us from even applying but this year we took a leap of faith and submitted a workshop proposal. Now that we have been accepted we want to make sure this dream opportunity becomes a reality.

The cost for the three of us to attend is pretty immense, especially considering our limited and different economic resources. We anticipated being able to cover a portion of the cost but we will need your help to get all three of us there. We hope that our vibrant community of fatties, QTPOC, friends and family will help us make this trip possible. 

We need help covering the following costs:

Plane tickets $1800 (flights from Portland to Detroit are ~650 and flights from Salt Lake City are ~$550)
Housing $500 (we found an airbnb across the street from the university that would allow us to room together and cook meals to save money)
Transportation/taxis $100
Registration $150 (we were awarded an additional $150 from AMC to use towards registration but we would like to contribute more to the conference beyond that amount)

Trip Total 2550 + ~150 for indiegogo fees

Grand total 2700

Anything we raise here above and beyond this amount will go towards food and supplies for our workshop and our rewards offered here. 

If you can’t donate (and we totally understand that many folks won’t be able to), we hope that you will still support us by spreading the word or consider donating items/skills that we can add to our rewards offered.

We do this work to leave evidence of ourselves, those of us who are simultaneously unseen and hypervisible in our queer, fat, brown bodies. Please help us in doing this work!

Thank you! 

Cory, Jess, and Esther 

(read more about us and our workshop at the link!)

[Image of three fat folks of color next to the link.]

One of these fat folks of color is a mod for this blog! Please help these three fat folks of color make it to the Allied Media Conference. Donate or reblog please! Fat people color talking about visibility is important work!

tierracita:

2013: Fierce fat femme of color magic
Happy new years.
Xoxo

[Fat xicana woman stand sideways with hand on hip, slightly smiling with long brown hair draped over one shoulder, in front of a purple and green backdrop. She is wearing a turquoise pleated shift dress with gold belt, grey sheer tights, gold earrings, and black flats.]
Tierracita is a fat femme of color badass! She also happens to be one of our moderators! 

tierracita:

2013: Fierce fat femme of color magic

Happy new years.

Xoxo

[Fat xicana woman stand sideways with hand on hip, slightly smiling with long brown hair draped over one shoulder, in front of a purple and green backdrop. She is wearing a turquoise pleated shift dress with gold belt, grey sheer tights, gold earrings, and black flats.]

Tierracita is a fat femme of color badass! She also happens to be one of our moderators! 

mistresssam:

Your fat acceptance and Body Positive Moments must be viciously and visibly anti-racist.


The fat acceptance movement must become intersectional. It must also fight for the humanity of people of color. It must be vocally and visibly and obviously anti-racist or it will be pointless. If…

quelola:

feral-femme:

queercuban:

More and more people are coming out about having chemical sensitivities, or what some folks refer to as chemical injury. There are many of your friends who have asthma, have MCS, have been through chemo, etc, who don’t mention it cause they don’t feel entitled or want to get in a fight, but if you cut down on scents, they will be really happy. A lot of people are chemically injured through doing industrial labor- cleaning houses, using or being exposed to pesticides as farmworkers, and growing up in neighborhoods with a lot of industrial pollution. Chemical sensitivity is a POC issue.”


this is not only a great educational resource on MCS, but has a TON of resources/product recommendations for going fragrence free while being a fierce brown femme (or not brown/not femme)!!!

So many of the options are also cheap! Going fragrance free can be tough, try switching out one product at a time. Start with deodorant, then laundry detergent, then shampoo and conditioner (for example) if you can’t go cold turkey.

The one challenge I have is finding fragrance free and/or chemically conscious lipstick and gloss (essential to my femmeness!)… I’ve been on a mission to find some. If anyone knows of any please share!

(Source: billierain)

quelola:

queerfathungry:

“This letter is written to our fat community to express great concern over what appears to be a growing divide among us.”

Text at link:

a response to white fat activism

from People of Color in the fat justice movement

This letter is written to our fat community to express great concern over what appears to be a growing divide among us.

We continue to see fat activism growing and our community expanding, and while this brings great joy, it also becomes more and more apparent that we are not doing the work to prevent our community from being divided along race and socio-economic lines. We are not having the hard conversation needed to build the truly solid foundation of inclusivity and diversity that we rest much of our argument of anti-oppression upon. This is particularly important since both government programs and the diet industry have been specifically singling out and targeting people of color in recent campaigns. From Michelle Obama’s selection of Beyonce Knowles as the face of her national campaign against obese children to the disproportionate number of children of color represented in the state of Georgia’s “Strong4Life” campaign, the face of the “obesity epidemic” in public policy has largely become people of color. Similarly, the diet industry has focused several of its most recent national advertising campaigns around African American celebrity icons, including the selection of Janet Jackson as a representative of Nutria System, and Charles Barkley and Jennifer Hudson as spokespeople for Weight Watchers.

While fat activism in the United States continues to be predominantly white, there is an emerging wave of fat People of Color (POC) activists moving out into all aspects of our communities. Joining with fat POC activists who have been working for years to create space for the unique challenges faced by POC within our mainstream diet culture, this has the potential to be a time of enormous shift in the perception and face of fat activism in the U.S. We are excited to be a part of this paradigm shift, and to see more of our experience reflected in the work of fat activism.

We hold grassroots organizing in high regard, because we know from experience that having established relationships with individuals aids in activating their enthusiasm for a project. While this is true, it also limits the reach of our work to our personal networks and circles. This is especially troublesome in the world of social media platforms like Facebook. Sending out an invitation for all contacts to participate is not the same as doing the thoughtful work of being inclusive, which requires planning, communication among groups, and transparency. Blanket invitation through social media, or “crowd sourcing,” returns a large response from those already closely related to the issue, who often share the initiator’s stance, privileges, and power.

This can be seen in the recent “Stand4Kids” campaign, most recently renamed the “I stand against weight bullying” campaign (seen here) launched by Marilyn Wann. This campaign is a great example of a provocative and direct action within the fat community, created to address fat shaming and body prejudice aimed at the children of Georgia through positive images of people of all sizes. The Georgia campaign “Strong4Life” (mentioned earlier in this letter) features a high number of children of color, and is being primarily aimed at children of color in Georgia’s poor neighborhoods. The primary organizer of “Stand4Kids/I stand against weight bullying” does not share these lived experiences, and while that truth does not mean that the organizer should not lead the project, it does raise a flag that the difference in experience between the organizer and the communities being addressed must be bridged in order to develop authentic and lasting relationships. Because the campaign launched through a crowd sourcing technique on Facebook, many of the first respondents were similarly white fat activists. As the campaign grew, it was reposted numerous times by many other white fat activists, none of whom were publicly critical of the lack of representation in the images and in the campaign’s design and implementation.

At that time, a group of POC fat activists began to discuss their disappointment at both the campaign and lack of critical response by the larger fat community. A person of color raised questions on the “Stand4Kids” tumblr about the tools used to make the project inclusive, the intent and possible effect of the projects in communities of color, and the ways in which these images would be used to support children of color in Georgia. The response was disappointing: these discussions had not happened within this project, and the commenter was told that if they wanted to support diversity within the project, they, as a person of color, should join the project’s Facebook page and offer solutions. More recently, the organizer of the campaign did address this posted concern to acknowledge that the proper outreach had not been done, and that she would take the questions posed on board.

As the project has grown and moved outside of its immediate sphere of contact, more and more people of color have began to participate. To date, the images on the “Stand4Kids/I stand against weight bullying” campaign site are still predominantly white individuals. Our critique of this campaign is not intended to imply that the campaign should not exist, that the organizers should not do the work, or that the images that have been created will not be effective in inspiring residents of Georgia to oppose the “Strong4Life” campaign. We offer this critique as one example of a fat activist action moving forward into a campaign without initial discussion of the inclusion of, or impact to, the communities it seeks to serve. Luckily, conversations can happen at many points during a movement; there are countless opportunities for growth, connection, and coalition.

The time has been long in the coming to again address the prevalent attitudes of socio-economic privilege and white-centric thought in fat activism. When open and authentic conversations about race and class fail to happen, we see these attitudes in the ways that people are left out of conversations. We see people who live with great privilege speaking as authorities on the impact of racism and classism, without basing their approach in the ally model. We see large size acceptance campaigns launched without coalition among diverse groups, thoughtful discussion around inclusivity, or well-versed allies on hand to help answer questions and facilitate community conversation. We see white allies depending heavily on POC and poor people to discern, direct, and implement the work of addressing these concerns within our communities only after or in response to work being presented that does not include their voices. We see white allies responding defensively and closing down conversations when presented with clear questions about taking steps to do their own work of finding ally mentors, addressing the ways their own acknowledged and unacknowledged privilege directly affects members of their community, and engaging in thoughtful dialogue about the interconnectedness of oppressions and the diverse ways those oppressions affect different members of our communities.

Overly simplified analogies of power and privilege are no longer the face of fat activism. We, as a large and diverse community with a vast wealth of life experiences and resources, can do better. We can go deeper; we can form authentic and strong coalition with one another.

White allies of the fat justice movement:

Flying by the seat of your pants, when it comes to addressing the real concerns and questions around diversity and inclusion of POC in fat activist spaces or campaigns, will no longer be good enough.

  • POC in the fat justice movement deserve thoughtful and clear discussions around not just the intention of diversity and inclusion in the work you wish to do, but also the actual impact of the work within communities of color.
  • POC in the fat justice movement demand and deserve that white fat activists build authentic collaborations with communities of color and work as allies.
  • POC in the fat justice movement demand and deserve allies showing up to the table of our campaigns and work, rather than constantly being told they have made a place for us at theirs.
  • POC in the fat justice movement clarify that our allies will practice doing the work of learning about the histories and impacts of colonization and oppression on POC, seek other allies to learn from and with, be open to dialogue, taking feedback, and allowing people’s firsthand experiences of racism to be the final and authoritative voice on the subject of impact to communities of color.
  • POC in the fat justice movement offer that through the work of authentic inclusivity, singular vision will become shared vision. Coalition will happen. Bridges will be mended and built.

We are looking forward to a stronger, more representational expression of fat community in which POC and poor people’s voices are heard, their experiences are respected, and their work to strengthen their individual communities is supported just as they work to support others.

Please join us.

In solidarity,
Tara Shuai, Co-president of NOLOSE
Galadriel Mozee, Co-president of NOLOSE
Virgie Tovar
Geleni Fontaine
Margarita Feminista
Julia Starkey
Amy Ongiri
M. Taueret Davis
Naima Lowe

I love this I live this.

Please please please read this! I would have bolded for emphasis but it is all so important!

[Image Description: A brown mermaid with long black hair, fuchsia ornate flower in their hair, long black hair, turquoise earrings. The top of her mermaid outfit is fuchsia with scallop breast detail, the body is sequins turquoise with baby blue tiered tail. She stands with one hand on her hip, smiling in clear blue water.]
rosemannequin:

prettyplussize:

photographer © HillCountryVision 2010, edited by Purple Princess Edits

sexy, sexy mermaid!

[Image Description: A brown mermaid with long black hair, fuchsia ornate flower in their hair, long black hair, turquoise earrings. The top of her mermaid outfit is fuchsia with scallop breast detail, the body is sequins turquoise with baby blue tiered tail. She stands with one hand on her hip, smiling in clear blue water.]

rosemannequin:

prettyplussize:

photographer © HillCountryVision 2010, edited by Purple Princess Edits

sexy, sexy mermaid!

(via navigatethestream)

Tags: poc mermaid brown

[Image Description: Two people standing against a wall. The person on the viewers left has short hair, square framed glasses, their thumbs in their jean pockets and one foot bent and on the wall behind them. The other person has her hair in a bun one arm on her hip and her legs grossed. For clothing description see below.]
fatshionfebruary:

The weather was brisk today and I wanted to take full advantage of it. In case my face looks familiar to some of you, it’s because quelola, a mod at Fat People Of Color, is my identical twin sister. I discussed with her juxtaposing a few outfits this month to show how uniquely different our styles can be.
I’m wearing a thrifted Levi’s jacket that I cut the sleeves off of. My shirt is a Police shirt, my shorts are originally pants from Old Navy that I turned into cut-offs, my shoes are Converse.
Lola is wear a 2011 Coachella v-neck , her skirt is Forever 21+, belt from ASOS, Macy’s tights and Steve Madden boots.
( via chill-murray )

[Image Description: Two people standing against a wall. The person on the viewers left has short hair, square framed glasses, their thumbs in their jean pockets and one foot bent and on the wall behind them. The other person has her hair in a bun one arm on her hip and her legs grossed. For clothing description see below.]

fatshionfebruary:

The weather was brisk today and I wanted to take full advantage of it. In case my face looks familiar to some of you, it’s because quelola, a mod at Fat People Of Color, is my identical twin sister. I discussed with her juxtaposing a few outfits this month to show how uniquely different our styles can be.

I’m wearing a thrifted Levi’s jacket that I cut the sleeves off of. My shirt is a Police shirt, my shorts are originally pants from Old Navy that I turned into cut-offs, my shoes are Converse.

Lola is wear a 2011 Coachella v-neck , her skirt is Forever 21+, belt from ASOS, Macy’s tights and Steve Madden boots.

( via chill-murray )

mytongueisforked:

nototherwisestated:

poc- Punks of color

I need more punks of colour in my life!!!!

[Image Description: Six poc people sitting on a stoop.]

mytongueisforked:

nototherwisestated:

poc- Punks of color

I need more punks of colour in my life!!!!

[Image Description: Six poc people sitting on a stoop.]

(Source: , via espiritdelescalier)

quelola:

[Image Description: a photo of me in front of a tree with hands on my hips. Not pictured: black wedges with a zipper on the side.] Noche bueno post-gift opening and wand ceremony for the niblings.
Close up of accessories.

quelola:

[Image Description: a photo of me in front of a tree with hands on my hips. Not pictured: black wedges with a zipper on the side.]
Noche bueno post-gift opening and wand ceremony for the niblings.

Close up of accessories.

Four Basic Principles That #OWS Can Implement to Address its White Privilege, Colonialist, White Supremacy [First Draft]

I requested to post the following in this space to maintain anonymity and I’d like to thank the mods of this space for allowing me to do so. I also want to acknowledge that this is a first draft and that changes may be made. I would also like to thank those who helped me edit this piece and those who sent me resources. Any desired contact with the author can be sent here and they will reach the author. I wrote this quickly and small edits will be made to this post, so please check this space for the most recent versions. Please do not repost outside of tumblr without permission.

Edit: Backstrory I was asked for permission to use my thoughts after an email exchange with Colin Frangicetto of Circa Survive. I want to thank him for referencing to this piece in his excellent essay "Finding Occupy Wall Street: Democracy, Elephants and Jackassery" over at Alternative Press. It is definitely worth the read.

============================================

As it stands now, both in my personal experience of visiting a local camp, following user created media and information sharing, mainstream media, and speaking with people in my communities, OWS has a white, cis male, able-bodied face and agenda. But before I get to that, I want to acknowledge and honor that there have been people of color (POC), lgtbq people, people with disabilities and many other people who experience oppression every day that are fighting to have their voices heard within this movement and who have been doing the work that is necessary to make this an inclusive movement. What I am now proposing is that those people in a position of privilege do the work necessary to make OWS across the country a safe space for more people to participate. Here are some ways that aren’t easy, but are necessary to have progressive change and a truly inclusive space and movement.

1)    Recognize your individual and systemic white privilege. White privilege plays a major role in the OWS movement for a lot of different reasons. White privilege is experienced by white folx and plays into the large problem of heteronormativity, ableism, hierarchicy. Because we live in a society that values white people more than anything else, we must acknowledge and recognize that addressing white privilege is addressing all other forms of oppression. If the movement can find a way to call out and fight against white privilege, we are fighting against the larger issue of oppression. Recognize that OWS remains a “white peoples movement”, operating under a system that plays preference to the white experience and within the confines of white supremacy. We are still coloring within the lines allowed to us by the 99% and the 1% using only one color and one method, and sometimes the crayon may be held by a different hand, but we are still required to follow the directions.

2)   Change the name. From the beginning of OWS, has had some adamant voices who have been against using the term “occupy”. Occupy Wall Street uses language that is oppressive. The term “occupy” is rooted in privilege because of the assumed right to take a space over. Many Natives and non-Natives have expressed extreme disapproval of the use of the term “occupy”. All non-Native folx have already been occupying this land without permission for over 500 years. Communities of color also have a history of experienced occupation through colonialism and gentrification. To use that rhetoric isn’t fighting back against the white supremacy of the 1%, it is reinforcing it.  Using this term has allowed for the continued oppression of Native people and has given the movement a face of exclusion. It has perpetuated a colonialist mentality that allows people to think that it is okay to “occupy” a space without regard to the past history of that space and the people who that space really belonged to. As an example, in Oakland, the camp set up in Frank Ogawa Plaza and renamed it Oscar Grant Plaza. It allowed for the erasure of one person of color and renamed it after another person of color without regard to how this might create tension among people of color. Using the term “occupy” sets up a dialogue and action that is dismissive of people of color from wanting to participate, it changed the dialogue and the actions that has been occurring and will occur. If and when the name is changed a larger dialogue can begin on how to decolonize the minds.

3)   Recognize that all forms of participation are valid. I want to acknowledge briefly class privilege, which is also white privilege, which exists within Occupy Wall Street. When the movement first began, many people who had the privilege to recognize they were being oppressed, were doing so because they were college students who now had a tremendous amount of debt. For many of them, this was probably the first type of oppression they have experienced. The middle class and “lower” middle class were finally waking up. There has been inherent class privilege because many people don’t have the opportunity to even attend college or take out loans. So that leads to a space that is only safe for the few. Many cis women, queer, trans*, disabled, and people of color have not been able to feel safe in the camps. I have felt this first hand. I chose not to take part in many of the actions that Occupy Oakland has done because I didn’t want to make myself a target to police AND I also didn’t want to make myself a target to white cis men. I finally decided when and how I would participate and made sure that it was safe for me to do so. This leads me to my point: we should not place a hierarchical value system on the work the individual is doing. There has been work many people are doing outside the camp, among their own circle of friends, among co-workers, blogs and other online media and space, and in their own communities that may not require them to set up camp somewhere but does allow them to start and continue dialogue in safe spaces. Another reason this is necessary is to combat ableist sentiments. Allowing people to think that the only way to contribute is to attend a General Assembly, march in a rally, and/or set up camp, is not recognizing that there is much more work to be done and many ways to do it. It dismisses peoples concerns over creating and existing in safe spaces and inclusive spaces. This also means that we must acknowledge that not everyone in the movement will be non-violent and non-destructive. Many people, especially communities of color, have long been experiencing police brutality in all forms and “violence” will be a method that some choose to use in response to police brutality. To disregard and devalue violence is to devalue the individual experience of police brutality. Combating against ableism, not placing a value system on the work people are doing, and not having negative sentiments towards what is being labeled an “anarchist” actions among OWS, is creating a more inclusive and safe space, and expanding and creating a progressive movement. Also, the movement must continue to ask how they are including the “working class”, the unemployed, the homeless and the undocumented into the movement.

4)   Know and learn perspectives of history outside of the white, male perspective; respect individual history. Don’t question the individuals on the validity of a claim that something is racist, ableist, promoting colonialism, white supremacist, trans*phobic, homophobic, and/or when they call you out, is wrong or incorrect sentiment-especially when they are speaking about it from a personal perspective. Valuing the history of individuals and of communities is essential to moving forward. Recognize that all oppressed people and communities have been experiencing their oppression for a lot longer than OWS has existed, and that work has been happening to fight back against privilege for a long time. Comparing this movement to other movement of the past, when this one is led by white folx, is not understanding or respecting the struggles of other communities. Many people of color have been doing all types of activism work, social justice work, fighting back against tyranny for a lot longer than OWS has existed. While OWS may be doing some things that can be labeled as revolutionary, some of the tactics that OWS is using are rooted in communities of color, therefore, not being inclusive isn’t just hurtful to POC, but detrimental to the community and movement as a whole. Not only that, but when white activist use the methods of communities of color, they automatically change that method to the white persons experience, so while it may seem the same, in a sense they are appropriating and devaluing the work of communities of the past and present. All individuals who experience oppression are already fighting every day against this oppression by merely existing. So to exclude these individuals from the movement is not fighting back against a 1%, it is empowering the system to continue. 

My critique is by no means a dismissal of the movement. It is a challenge to the white, cis, able-bodied, privileged individuals to do some much-needed self-reflection on how they operate within the movement. Questions that white privileged people within OWS should be asking themselves:

1) How am I operating within this space?

2) Am I making this a safe space for EVERYONE? Why? Why not? When? When not? How? How not?

3) How does my personal lived experience give me privilege?

4) How do I experience oppression?

5) How is my history one of oppressing?

6) How is the history of communities I am a part of been exclusive?

7)  Am I listening when I need to? Learning when I need to? Staying quiet when I need to? Allowing myself to be open to the experience of others?

8) How do I play into a system of white supremacist, heteronormative, colonializtion?

9) Am I making myself uncomfortable by questioning my own existence in order to grow and learn?

10) How am I showing solidarity to other communities that are also present here?

11) Where can I be right now to learn more?

12) Is my presence in this space welcomed? Is my presence hindering the dialogue?

13) How am I documenting this? Should I be writing, recording, what I see happening to make sure the media doesn’t make it look differently? Am I writing from personal experience without making generalizations and assumptions about something I am not?

14) Am I giving other people the tools to openly express what they feel and their experience?

15) How is my being asked to share my experience on any platform playing into heteronormative, ableist, privileged, colonized thinking?

16) How am validating or invalidating other people’s experiences?

 

Further Reading:

Unsettling America: Decolonization in Theory and Practice

Rosa De Fuego on Anarchist Action

OWS Must Resist Cis-Supremacy and Trans-Mysogyny

In Front and Center: Critical Voices of the 99%

How to Make Occupy Wall Street More Trans-Inclusive

Qualities of A White Anti-Racist Ally

Becoming A Anti-Racist White Ally: How An Affinity Group Can Help